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Is our government balanced or imbalanced?

Posted: June 13, 2014 2:00 a.m.
Updated: June 13, 2014 2:00 a.m.
 

Even during the original ratifications, implementation of procedures and policies in our government faced changes to the Constitution (or Articles of Confederation, March 1, 1781).

Changes came from George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson.

James Madison supported a stronger federal government. He was convinced that independence of states was utterly irreconcilable with their aggregate sovereignty: “One simple republic would be as inexpedient as it is unattainable”
(letter to George Washington).

Debates began in Convention over the Articles of Confederation. The debate ended with three bodies of authority in government — one not to overstep the other two — all three working together for the good of “We the People.”

What is the major weakness in our government today? It is the unwillingness by many of our elected officials to have the same vision for “We the People” as does the Constitution and did its framers.

“We the People” are at the point where we must accept or reject our Constitution.

Many support upholding our rule of law, but their concerns are met with objection from both parties. The lines of authority have become blurred.

After the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin was asked, “What have you wrought?” He answered, “A republic, if you can keep it.”

The executive office claims that the Constitution “gets in the way,” and through executive orders the Constitution is being unconstitutionally bypassed.

Barack Obama is following on the heels of previous presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, those whose disdain for constitutional checks an balances were often evident in the flurry of executive orders and presidential directives signed to get around Congress.

By comparison, George Washington only issued eight executive orders, and Thomas Jefferson just four. Executive orders and presidential directives were ways to establish work schedules for executive office employees or help agencies under the White House carry out their duties.

The Senate changed the rules so that “We the People” cannot be heard with the “nuclear option.” Now the Senate is talking about changes to our Second Amendment rights.

We need the same bipartisan effort made today as was made in the beginning of our nation.

We need candidates concerned less with party affiliation and more as to what is constitutional.

When they enter public service, politicians must plan on returning to civilian life and live under the same laws that they helped pass.

 

Comments

chico: Posted: June 13, 2014 7:17 a.m.

'Executive orders'? - ......

The number of times an E/O is used may not wind up to be so telling once you find out what each E/O was for.....so this is a weak example.

But I bet there are other, better examples of our leaders ignoring the law of the land and making lives worse.

Too bad lying to the country isn't unconstitutional.


projalice11: Posted: June 13, 2014 9:58 a.m.


"Is our government balanced or imbalanced?"

Imbalanced of course due to the obstruction by the GOP ..

Balance wouldn't be hard to obtain if candidates were less concerned with party
affiliation ..

What the world (United States) needs now is compromise, tolerance, compassion
and apathy ..


AlwaysRight: Posted: June 13, 2014 10:56 a.m.

"What the world (United States) needs now is compromise, tolerance, compassion and apathy .."

How does apathy fit with that? Sorry, not understanding....


Indy: Posted: June 13, 2014 6:21 p.m.

LTE wrote: We need the same bipartisan effort made today as was made in the beginning of our nation. We need candidates concerned less with party affiliation and more as to what is constitutional. When they enter public service, politicians must plan on returning to civilian life and live under the same laws that they helped pass.

Indy: I agree and can only suggest that the media get off its ‘if it bleeds it leads’ mentality and start ‘investigating’ why politicians don’t use our accumulated knowledge to make decisions but instead pander to the ideology of either party that fails to address our modern problems.

And the pandering to the public’s ignorance using ‘focus group tested’ slogans versus educating the public is pathetic and without honor . . .


OldReliable: Posted: June 14, 2014 7:04 a.m.

The GOP House has passed numerous bills which languish in the DEM Senate. Just an FYI, Alice.


ricketzz: Posted: June 16, 2014 7:33 a.m.

The Constitution was in no way a "bipartisan" effort. The thought of political parties was unthinkable to the Founders.

The country is at war and during war Prez is allowed to be a dictator. Read the AUMF and the NDAA that Howard P is ramming through Congress (complete with billions for projects the DoD doesn't want or need.)


17trillion: Posted: June 16, 2014 9:48 a.m.

We need more apathy? Apathy is the problem. Just ask a random sample of 100 people who the vice president is. THAT, is the problem!



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