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David Hegg: Some advice for graduates

Posted: June 22, 2014 2:00 a.m.
Updated: June 22, 2014 2:00 a.m.
 

As graduation season comes to a close, I have some advice for those who are entering a new phase of life called adulthood. And, the advice is good for the rest of us as well.

Social scientists today tell us that adolescence, once a description of age 12 to 18, now is expanded to age 30. Statistics prove that many “twenty-somethings” are unsettled their careers, relationships and even addresses until then. Tragically, this is having a negative effect on our society. Here are some thoughts on leaving adolescence behind in favor of a satisfying adulthood. To make them easy to remember we’ll call them the 4 C’s.
Character: More than anything else, invest in who you need to be. Character is the result of convictions combined with courage. It is knowing right from wrong, and courageously pursuing right regardless of the consequences. It is being faithful to the highest values, persistent in their outworking, and consistent in ways that make others look to you as trustworthy, and capable of handling greater responsibility.

No amount of talent, energy, or position can put in what character leaves out. Understand that this world is not easy, and those who fail to form a solid ethical foundation will most often end up with empty lives, no matter how large their portfolio.

Competency: With character as the foundation, successful people are diligent in the pursuit of excellence in all areas of life. Good enough is seldom good enough. In the world of sport, it is usual for those who have just won an important game or match to tell the media that they can still play better, prepare better, and reach a higher level of performance.

In a world that changes its expectations daily, and invents new technologies, systems and ways of thinking every week, those who become complacent with their present level of competency will soon find themselves outmoded.

What’s more, it is the passionate desire to get better that keeps the mind hungry for knowledge, and the heart radically focused on improvement. While contentment is an ethical position that allows us to enjoy the moment, complacency is never something you should allow to rent space in your life.

Chemistry: Here I don’t mean the class in organic processes, but rather the ability to get along with people. At its center, life is about relationship. We were created by God to gain emotional and spiritual life from what others contribute to us. But, if you are arrogant, or cynical, or mean-spirited, or lazy, or mean, or angry, or simply unable to engage others with courtesy and authentic interest, you’ll never amount to much no matter how you score success. You’ll never be part of the team because people won’t want you around!

The best things in life have never been things, or the wealth that can buy them. People matter, and those who understand this, and collect friends as though they were diamonds, will have happier, more satisfying lives.

Capacity: For most, adulthood is much longer than we realize when we take our first steps into that world. What you will be at 50 depends on how well you build a capacity for change, growth, knowledge, and flexibility.

Regardless of the world you’re entering in now, I can guarantee the world will be significantly different in 30 years. Don’t get left out because you’re happy with who you are and what you can do now. Grow your capacity to be valuable in the future by committing to be a life-long learner.

Every year thousands of diplomas are handed out to smart, industrious graduates. But, sadly, too many of them think the journey has ended, and the marketplace owes them a lucrative position. But the converse is truer.

Graduates owe the marketplace, and our society, the debt of starting a new journey in adulthood with humility, respect for those who have gone before, and a radical desire to look out, not only for their own interests, but also the interests of all of us. So, to all the grads … congratulations! Now, get to work and prove to us that you really did learn something.

David Hegg is a senior pastor of Grace Baptist Church and a Santa Clarita resident. “Ethically Speaking” runs Sundays in The Signal.

 

Comments

ricketzz: Posted: June 22, 2014 9:41 a.m.

".. But, if you are arrogant, or cynical, or mean-spirited, or lazy, or mean, or angry, or simply unable to engage others with courtesy and authentic interest, you’ll never amount to much no matter how you score success. You’ll never be part of the team because people won’t want you around!"

Thus the well meaning Pastor condemns those among us with non-verbal communications and other social deficiencies to an inferior life because we don't grin like idiots and pretend to like people we couldn't care less about. As much as you would like the world to be filled with happy smiling people who never get mad, that is a television fantasy.

If recent grads owe us anything, it is a severe thrashing. We let the Revolution get reversed. The Redcoats won after all. There is no future other than struggle.


jvfarley: Posted: June 22, 2014 10:05 a.m.

ricketzz, what does non-verbal communication have to do with what David is saying. that argument is a non sequitur if I've ever seen one. Is being arrogant, cynical, mean spirited, angry a "social deficiency?" I would say it is. Is this "social deficiency" something an individual can change? Absolutely.

I believe you really miss the point about David Hegg's excellent article. Your argument really does come off as cynical.


chefgirl358: Posted: June 22, 2014 10:41 a.m.

Geez Ricketzz.

Great article! I often disagree with Mr. Hegg, but I enjoyed this article and agree wholeheartedly with his message.


LuLu: Posted: June 22, 2014 5:32 p.m.

Collect friends as long as they're in the Grace Baptist church,Pastor Hegg & his followers are absolutely intolerant to other religions,check out their website & listen to the teachings about "those Mormons",truly saddening...


Indy: Posted: June 22, 2014 6:02 p.m.

Hegg writes: Every year thousands of diplomas are handed out to smart, industrious graduates. But, sadly, too many of them think the journey has ended, and the marketplace owes them a lucrative position. But the converse is truer.

Indy: I was wondering if Hegg could give graduates some sound advice but he immediately retreats to his ‘entitlement’ roots and suggest that the ‘marketplace owes them a lucrative position’.

The unfortunate reality is that religious leaders are not well ‘learned’ in economics . . . and from what we see today, globalization has changed the ‘level playing field’ for all workers including new graduates.

Many young people can’t find jobs since no jobs exists . . .

As we see now in China, a college graduate there starts at about $300 US. As multinationals stay focused on ‘profit maximization’, many American graduates will be left at the employment altar if you will as these companies ‘off shore’ even professional work.

In any event, Hegg could have phrased his decree differently and not so in the ‘negative’ sense about feeling ‘entitled’ even with a degree.


therightstuff: Posted: June 23, 2014 12:15 a.m.

"""Many young people can’t find jobs since no jobs exists . . ."""

Even after Obama's stimulus package of nearly $1,000,000,000 added to our national debt. Let's hope this nightmare ends soon.

11/04/14


ricketzz: Posted: June 23, 2014 10:11 a.m.

"But, if you are...simply unable to engage others with courtesy and authentic interest, you’ll never amount to much no matter how you score success."

I said it pretty clearly. If you aren't prepared to lie to people and pretend you like them you'll never get anywhere. I can't lie. I'm terrible at it. When people ask me how I'm doing I tell them; who knew that was a faux pas? Where do you learn to be a social phony?

I have worked for idiot companies that insist everyone be positive all day long; where no one gets ahead without kissing undeserving butt, and for someone like me it is sheer hell. The social scene one has to negotiate, that has nothing to with with the product or service being provided, makes an otherwise passable job into a scary obstruction course where time barely moves.

jvfarley: People with Autism have un-curable social deficiencies. That pretty much sums up the disease, actually.

" We were created by God to gain emotional and spiritual life from what others contribute to us." (I call some people Psychic Vampires).


Indy: Posted: June 23, 2014 8:03 p.m.

Therightstuff wrote: """Many young people can’t find jobs since no jobs exists . . ."""

Even after Obama's stimulus package of nearly $1,000,000,000 added to our national debt. Let's hope this nightmare ends soon.

Indy: I’m glad the poster brought forth the stimulus package that indeed kept the US out of a full blown depression.

Had the package not have been ‘loaded up’ with 30% or so of tax cuts, the simulative effect would have been greater.

Why? Economist note that in a deep recession, tax cuts don’t create stimulus. But the ideology straightjacket that the GOP puts on legislation in DC sadly created less opportunity for our young people as we see today with the high employment of our youth including many with college degrees.

Additionally, I agree that the national debt is a big issue . . . and indeed now that the recovery has moved forward, we should be raising taxes to pay it back.

In any event, we know that Bush W ‘doubled’ the national debt even when he had control with his party of both houses of congress for 6 years . . .

Like it or not, republicans know that ‘debt’ does create ‘economic stimulus’.

And sadly, democrats who say the GOP isn’t doing anything more on stimulus is still seeing the deficits prop up the economy . . . another reason that economists are reluctant to suggest raising taxes even now.

But more importantly is the effects of globalization where ‘free trade’ has led to the off shoring of many US jobs due to the ‘wage differential’ in the developing world. While this helps multinational profits, it puts downward pressure on US wages on the remaining jobs that are left here.

Finally, the rejection by the GOP to raise the minimum wage is done on biblical scripture grounds that feel that people should have to work harder to earn more . . . which is fundamental correct . . . provided the effects of off shoring and downward pressure on wages weren’t in play.

If we’re to improve employment security and provide our unemployed more opportunity, we have to steer away from the ideology bounds that currently dominate our congress.


Indy: Posted: June 23, 2014 8:08 p.m.

Ricketzz wrote: I have worked for idiot companies that insist everyone be positive all day long; where no one gets ahead without kissing undeserving butt, and for someone like me it is sheer hell. The social scene one has to negotiate, that has nothing to with the product or service being provided, makes an otherwise passable job into a scary obstruction course where time barely moves.

Indy: Yes, having worked in the corporate world, I’ve see this as well.

Sadly, they have a lot of ‘team building’ idea sessions that never get to the work effort.

Likewise, middle management knows to ‘KEEP THEIR MOUTHS SHUT’ or risk being fired or at least passed over for any job promotions.

This is what’s happening to the VA as the congress cuts the budgets and middle management at these facilities who know that consequences are nevertheless conditioned to again, ‘KEEP THEIR MOUTHS SHUT’ or hide the consequences as best they can.

We can see that model doesn’t work but it’s never addressed by anyone in the media.


tech: Posted: June 24, 2014 1:54 a.m.

The VA Health Scandal Is about Government Incompetence, not Inadequate Funding

"VA funding has more than kept up with both medical inflation and increased patient loads. An analysis of budget and cost data, as well as data on the total number of VA patients and the number of acute inpatients treated, shows that the VA’s budget has grown much faster than its workload. Even when you take medical inflation into account, the VA budget still grew faster than its patient base since 2000. …The VA has a whole bunch of problems, but a lack of funding ain’t one."

http://danieljmitchell.wordpress.com/2014/06/01/the-va-health-scandal-is-about-government-incompetence-not-inadequate-funding/


ricketzz: Posted: June 24, 2014 8:55 a.m.

Tech makes a sweeping proclamation then backs it up with a blogger post. Does anyone else find this to be pathetically immature?


CaptGene: Posted: June 24, 2014 10:27 a.m.

Would you have preferred a "tweet"?

I assume you didn't bother to go to the blog tech linked, because if you did you would find (much to your dismay) that it is rife with links to sources like The Federalist, which is where the quote in tech's post originated.

Just curious, do you ever do any research, or is your posting some form of a digital tic?


tech: Posted: June 24, 2014 11:51 a.m.

The succinct demonstration of your intellectual rigor made my morning, ricketzz. Thanks! :-D


AlwaysRight: Posted: June 24, 2014 12:34 p.m.

My kid is working at a VA hospital back east. His company is doing an evaluation of supply inventory in the facility. They are installing a system that automatically weighs the supply bins to assess how much inventory is in the bins then automatically reorder. Cool idea but, needless to say, a very costly system with much opportunity for failure.

They did this because the nurses/staff refuse to log or barcode swipe items when they are withdrawn.

While I am happy for my son and his employment, this struck me as wrong on so many levels. Nurses refusing to log supply use screws up cost assessment to a case and is a simple discipline issue. Better management would correct that.

Secondly, most businesses (and hospitals) simply assign someone to check inventory and reorder when something reaches the reorder point. Its not that complex. Once again, good management would solve that issue.

The VA is broken on too many different levels. It needs a thorough house-cleaning with new staff and admin in most facilities. Gross mismanagement has been taken to high art at the VA.

Odd that our President noted this and ran on it as an election issue. To say he was unaware is not truthful. After 6 years, its still a mess. He cannot lay this on the doorstep of anyone else. He owns it fully and completely.


therightstuff: Posted: June 24, 2014 12:47 p.m.

Indy: "I’m glad the poster brought forth the stimulus package that indeed kept the US out of a full blown depression."

ricketzz: "Does anyone else find this to be pathetically immature?"


ricketzz: Posted: June 25, 2014 9:06 a.m.

I read the blog post, with links to other shaky sources. I understand the VA has tripled budgets since peacetime, but we have been at War since October 2001 and battlefield medicine has advanced to the point where people don't die from what used to kill them and the VA has unprecedented challenges that they obviously weren't up to. Instead of flinging blame we should work together to make the VA hospital system the showpiece it should be. They deliver good care and most vets like to be among other vets.


CaptGene: Posted: June 25, 2014 9:52 a.m.

cricketzz is always good for a laugh.


tech: Posted: June 25, 2014 12:24 p.m.

"…shaky sources." - ricketzz

http://mediatrackers.org/assets/uploads/2014/05/VA-Funding-Growth.png


CaptGene: Posted: June 25, 2014 5:07 p.m.

Again, Mr. Shaky Sources is the same guy that trusts the content at skepticalscience.com

That's all you need to know.


Indy: Posted: June 25, 2014 11:11 p.m.

Tech wrote: The VA Health Scandal Is about Government Incompetence, not Inadequate Funding.

Indy: Again, since I don’t know the background of this poster . . . he won’t disclose, that makes my response more difficult.

What’s interesting to me for conservatives that run on the ‘waste and fraud’ perennially, I for the absolute life of me can’t understand why these folks don’t take advantage of the management schools in the US that are perhaps the best in the world! Harvard School of Business, Wharton School of Business, Sloan School of Management at MIT . . . the list just goes on and on . . . yet all IGNORED!

Why not use that knowledge to run government?

We know that the techniques to manage organzations either public or private are basically the same.

And no one is stopping any republican at any time from using this expertise . . . yet they don’t . . .

As far as the funding issue goes, this is part of the management.

Had anyone been overseeing the VA, they could have determined by the ‘numbers’ that something was wrong.

So why didn’t any republicans look into this? What was stopping them?

These folks argue for enormous spending on defense and yet seem puzzled, confused, lost in the discussion when it comes for caring for the troops after they have served us.

Funding should be based on the ‘demands’ put forth in helping the soldiers not on ideology positions like advocating ‘lower taxes’ without any regard to the consequences of same.

In any event, there’s no excuse for any politician on this VA issue. None.

For both parties pointing fingers at each other substantiates why the recent Gallop poll shows such low rating for both the President and congress (now at just 7% approval!).


tech: Posted: June 26, 2014 12:14 a.m.

May I remind you, Indy, that in the thread you inferred that the VA issues where budget related. Obviously, you performed zero research on the topic.

Now that I've rebutted your inference, you respond with what can only be described as ideological mush.

As I've stated previously, if you reported to me professionally, I'd fire you for incompetence.

I suspect you have a government job. It's the only explanation for your employed status.


ricketzz: Posted: June 26, 2014 9:17 a.m.

If I thought you could do nuance and complex concepts I'd explain why sometimes a big pile of money is still not up to a task.

Every government agency is just like the DVA; corrupt through and through. This includes the DoD and the uniformed services. We need frog marching and Leavenworth. Start with Scalia and Thomas.


tech: Posted: June 26, 2014 2:05 p.m.

Another ad hominem without a rebuttal, ricketzz.

Attempt an explanation, if able, as I've not seen anything to date that I nor regular participants would deem beyond their comprehension.


ricketzz: Posted: June 27, 2014 10:12 a.m.

Everything in Washington D.C. is budget related. The Golden Age of Corruption began in 1981 when Reagan declared the Government was up for grabs to the highest bidders. He began his relentless 8 year program of telling the Great Unwashed that government was evil and it became somewhat true, like all Big Lies repeated often. Privatization has crippled everything it touches. We add complexity and insulation to public functions and get less for more money. There is no redeeming social value, except for a few shareholders and public servants who hate people.


tech: Posted: June 27, 2014 12:08 p.m.

"Privatization has crippled everything it touches." - ricketzz

Like the space launch vehicle business? Do you believe deregulation of airline fares and long distance telephone rates begun under Carter helped or hurt consumers? Should the U.S. Post Office stop partnering with private enterprise such as UPS, FedEx and Amazon because they'll be "crippled"?

You do know that JFK proposed tax cuts in 1962 and the Revenue Act of 1964 did so, right? It reduced the top personal marginal rate from 91% to 70% and corporate tax rate from 52% to 48%.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEdXrfIMdiU


Indy: Posted: July 3, 2014 10:20 p.m.

Tech wrote: May I remind you, Indy, that in the thread you inferred that the VA issues where budget related. Obviously, you performed zero research on the topic.

Indy: This is why your lack of basic business training hurts you . . . especially on this issue.

People hide ‘results’ when they can’t deal with them.

In the case of scheduling, the VA being underfunded couldn’t accommodate the ‘demand’ for services and thus the middle managers ‘hid the problem’ with ‘two sets of books’.

Tech wrote: `Now that I've rebutted your inference, you respond with what can only be described as ideological mush.

Indy: How can you rebuff anything when you’ve said really nothing . . .

Tech wrote: As I've stated previously, if you reported to me professionally, I'd fire you for incompetence.

Indy: No . . . you wouldn’t do that since it would cost you lots of money and leave you with only your current knowledge which you’ve demonstrated repeatedly just isn’t up to par.

Tech wrote: `I suspect you have a government job. It's the only explanation for your employed status.

Indy: LOL!


tech: Posted: July 4, 2014 3:53 a.m.

I would fire you as an efficiency measure. That would reduce costs.

What agency employs you?



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