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Trudi Nash: Drought-resistant plants

Posted: February 13, 2014 2:00 a.m.
Updated: February 13, 2014 2:00 a.m.
 

I don’t know who is responsible for this situation, nor do I know if it can be corrected, but I do feel like no one is seeing the reality of this.

The on- and off-ramps to Highway 14 at the crossing of Sand Canyon Road are being worked on to make them look more pleasing to the traveler.

On the positive side, it is giving a lot of work to a lot of people. However, although it has been designed with lots of rocks and wood chips, there is still a lot of the area being planted.

Except perhaps for the trees that have been put in, the rest of the plantings appear to be ice plant and a variety of yucca or cactus. These are drought-resistant plants.

All of this so far is logical with our location at the edge of the high desert.

That being said, I wonder why there are hundreds of sprinkler heads in the planting areas. My guess would be there is one every six square feet; I can’t judge correctly as I drive on the southbound on-ramp.

The ones on the northbound off-ramp are not visible from the ramp itself, but they are there in the same numbers.

These areas are hillside and therefore water runs downward.

Now we are being told constantly that we will have to conserve water (mandatory) since the state is in such a drought condition.

Any car that veers off the road will snap one of these sprinkler heads. They are vertical and about 12 inches high each, the kind that easily breaks on impact.

Most homeowners know that if one breaks, the water just runs out in full force, and in this case, onto the street and ramp.

It seems there might be many other ways to irrigate such an area that are less fragile and might have been a better choice, if indeed there is a need for irrigation at all.

Perhaps the powers that be should look into who is responsible for this poor design of irrigation when they have had the good sense to plant drought-resistant vegetation?

I hope the city will let us all know who made the irrigation decision and is paying the cost. Is this taxpayer money?

The public needs to know so they don’t hire (or elect?) the responsible person/firm to work for them in any other capacity.

If you have not used these on- and off-ramps because you live in a different part of the city, do take a drive over and check it out. The landscaping will surely look pretty.

But be careful — don’t accidentally veer off the road and cause damage to the sprinklers.

Trudi Nash is a Canyon Country resident.

 

Comments

ricketzz: Posted: February 13, 2014 6:41 a.m.

As long as the billboards stay the junction is tacky. Now it is tacky with succulents.


projalice11: Posted: February 13, 2014 8:12 a.m.

"Ice plants and a variety of yucca or cactus should be planted.
These are drought-resistant plants"

Hoping that the suggestion of ice plants and cactus be planted in the middle
of the ROUNDABOUT has come to pass.

By the way how is that nasty ROUNDABOUT doing?


philellis: Posted: February 13, 2014 8:32 a.m.

It works fine. Traffic moves counter clockwise, so that means it requires a right hand turn to exit it. Good luck.


17trillion: Posted: February 13, 2014 8:39 a.m.

Please Lois, stay away from the roundabout, for the sake of the community!


garyr: Posted: February 13, 2014 11:53 a.m.

I think they are actually agave


technologist: Posted: February 13, 2014 12:59 p.m.

"I think they are actually agave"

¡Tequila!



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