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Rock auction to benefit ill deputy

Colleagues go to work in helping SCV court deputy who has leukemia

Posted: February 28, 2009 1:43 a.m.
Updated: March 1, 2009 12:23 p.m.

Deputy Robert "Bobby" Corrales, right, is fighting leukemia. His wife Olga is by his side in this photo.

 
Some live to rock. Now rock can help someone live.

Many rock legends donated unique items to auction off on e-Bay to raise money for a Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputy stricken with a deadly form of leukemia.

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Robert "Bobby" Corrales, who is stationed at Santa Clarita Valley Superior Court, was recently stricken with acute myloid leukemia.

To show their support, Corrales' friend and former colleague Deputy Mike Ascolesce along with Deputy John Maio contacted friends from the music business and acquired numerous donations for the auction from some of rock's royalty.

"Items are being bid on so fast we can't keep up," Ascolesce said. "We know the money is going to someone really in need and we are making that difference in his life, by helping to save it."

The auction ends Monday.

Ninety percent of the proceeds from the auction will go directly to Corrales to help his family.

Ten percent of the proceeds will go to the T.J Martell Foundation, a nonprofit organization known as one of the world's primary funders of innovative, early stage cancer and AIDS research.

Corrales was on a vacation cruise to Mexico with his family and friends in April 2008, when suddenly he fell ill.

"He had to be flown back to the United States immediately," Ascolesce said. "(The) trip cost $30,000 which was not covered by his medical insurance."

Once back in California, Corrales was rushed to UCLA Medical Center and was diagnosed.

"He's in chemotherapy now and needs blood and a bone marrow transplant," Ascolesce said.

Corrales is of Mexican and Chinese ancestry, which increases the challenge to find a proper bone marrow match.

"Due to his ethnic diversity, finding a suitable match has proven to be incredibly difficult so far," Ascolesce said, "But we are not going to give up on him - he was always there for anyone in need and now it's his turn."

With the money raised in the auction, the deputies hope to help Corrales' family with the medical bills and also raise awareness of the cause.

Those interested in getting tested should do so at UCLA Medical Center, where Corrales currently receives treatment and awaits the donor who will give him the right match.

"You never know," Ascolesce said. "It could be you who saves this man's life."

UCLA Medical Center's phone number is (310) 415-1400.

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