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Political profiles: 38th Assembly District candidate Paul Strickland

Posted: May 20, 2012 5:00 a.m.
Updated: May 20, 2012 5:00 a.m.

Clockwise from top left: 38th District Assembly candidates Edward Headington, Patricia McKeon, Paul Strickland and Scott Wilk in a forum May 7 at the Hyatt Regency Valencia.

 

Paul Strickland knows more about being elected than any of his opponents in the race for the 38th Assembly District seat.

During his campaign, the married Canyon Country father of three and veteran member of the William S. Hart Union High School District governing board has repeatedly reminded local forum audiences of his electoral track record.

The 28-year Santa Clarita Valley resident has been elected to more public offices more often than any of the other three contenders.

A first-time grandfather this year, Strickland is fulfilling a childhood dream by running for the state Assembly, he told The Signal this month.

He called becoming a grandfather “life-changing,” and being elected would be “the same dream I’ve always had.”

He said he’s loved politics since he was young, and when he was “real little” he watched political debates on TV with an aunt who was also passionate about politics.

At school, when asked about his ambitions, his answer was always the same, he said: “I said I wanted to be governor or president.”

Becoming Assemblyman for the 38th District is part of that “same dream,” he said.

Strickland stepped down from his position with Assemblyman Cameron Smyth so he could run for the office himself.

Like his Republican opponents, Strickland is opposed to raising taxes, over-regulation and the prospect of Cemex mining in Soledad Canyon.


In driving home his position to make California more business friendly, Strickland has used recent public forums to reflect on more than 30 years of experiences in the animated film industry for companies such as Hanna-Barbera, Warner Brothers, Marvel, Universal and Disney.

Among his qualifications he cites a personal grasp of the economic pitfalls that beset industry workers — layoffs, competitive film tax incentives offered out-of-state and out-sourcing.

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