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Legacy science students learn about NASA

Posted: April 24, 2012 1:55 a.m.
Updated: April 24, 2012 1:55 a.m.

Science teacher Kelly Duffy, with her husband, Michael, and daughter Miranda.

 

In February, Legacy Christian Academy’s third- and fifth-graders designed a crew exploration vehicle for the virtual student symposium run by NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia.

The students were asked, “What will replace the space shuttle?” The challenge was to create a model that could be used for future space exploration.

Using NASA News breaks and NASA Now videos for research and inspiration, students investigated, sketched and built their own designs and models for a Crew Exploration Vehicle, then shared their best features.

The fifth-grade students, demonstrating exceptional teamwork, decided which features were most important for a real crew exploration vehicle and worked together to build a class model.

This exciting project concluded with a presentation of the class blueprints and completed model to NASA specialists.

The students were thrilled to interact with NASA aerospace engineer, Jill Prince.

She asked them questions about their designs and the students asked her what it’s like to be an aerospace engineer. The collaboration was a great success.

Last fall, fourth grade students participated in a video conference during two live feeds with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Legacy’s third-graders created a Flight Mission Patch and presented it to Kelly Witherspoon from NASA’s Space Center in Mississippi.

Legacy’s science courses are taught by Kelly Duffy, who recently attended a NASA training experience in Huntsville, Ala., to learn about water infiltration on the International Space Station.

She has also visited the command center for the International Space Station. Duffy leads a comprehensive science program incorporating innovative hands-on experiments in Legacy’s science lab.

Duffy believes children should be encouraged to explore the world around them and be active participants.

“I love seeing the wonder and surprise of the world through young eyes,” she said. “I believe it’s critical to teach science, technology, engineering and mathematics at an early age.”

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