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Community helps local girl diagnosed with leukemia

Posted: January 7, 2011 2:29 p.m.
Updated: January 8, 2011 2:29 p.m.
 

In late 2010, the Greene family of Stevenson Ranch learned that their 5-year-old daughter Libriti, an inquisitive kindergartener with an illuminating spirit, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoma Leukemia (ALL).

"For the Love of Libriti," a Facebook Page created by volunteers in support of the Greene family, is reaching out to the local community to collect necessities for Libriti and her family. Click here to visit the page.

Suggested donations include gift cards for gas, local restaurants and grocery stores.

Donations may also be mailed or deposited directly into a bank account. See Related Content for more information.

Libriti's shocking diagnosis came less than a week after her parents, Senta and Russ, first noticed a quarter-sized bruise on her stomach. Noticing several more bruises and petechiae (red spots) randomly appear on her body in the days that followed, they brought Libriti to the doctor.

In a span of 45 minutes, Libriti's blood was drawn, she was diagnosed with leukemia and immediately rushed to the hospital via ambulance, where she received a blood and platelet transfusion, a spinal tap and confirmation that she was, in fact, a very sick little girl.

Libriti's strength, sense of humor and positive energy, along with the love of her big brother Hunter, father and mother -- due in March with little brother Ethan -- would get her through the next week. She was released in time to spend Christmas at home with her family.

On Dec. 28, the Greene family received promising news. Based on a biopsy, they were told Libriti's leukemia had gone into remission. But doctors had also discovered something they didn't expect: a rare abnormal chromosome called "Philadelphia Chromosome (PH+)," which is found in 5 percent of all cases and linked with a 20 percent survival rate.

What the Greene family is going through could happen to anyone at any time. It's unimaginable that a mom, known throughout the SCV and beyond for her important work as a child advocate, could suddenly be fighting for her own child's life.

Senta Greene has made a life working with the families at a time they need her most. Now the self-employed mother, just weeks away from giving birth, needs the community to do the same for her. She and husband Russ, an investigator, work tirelessly to care for their daughter while continuing to provide for their family. But without a regular income, the cost of insurance premiums, additional medical bills and even just bare necessities could wipe them out.

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