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Horton’s conclusion not realistic

Posted: February 27, 2010 3:37 p.m.
Updated: February 27, 2010 3:18 p.m.
 
Regarding Gary Horton's column "They got between me and my doctor" (The Signal, Feb. 17):

First of all, you pointed out some very salient points: When Anthem tried to raise its rates, it lost business to a competitor. Sounds like the expected free-market result. If insurance companies were allowed to compete across state lines, we'd see a whole lot more of this result.

X-rays are cheaper than MRIs, so if the X-ray had diagnosed the problem without need of the MRI, the company would have saved money. And the only way to find that out is to do it, so that sounds like a good business practice to me.

Insurance rates keep going up, you say. That's true; they do.

So does everything else. When I was in college, gas cost 25 cents per gallon. I don't think that's coming back in this lifetime, either.
You talk about "50 million Americans (and growing every day) who have no health insurance." Well, that's a made-up number I've never seen anywhere else, but even so - so what?

A lot of people exercise their right of free choice to elect to not be insured because they see no need for it: healthy young folks, rich folks, folks with certain religious convictions, etc.

Granted, some want insurance and can't afford it. Again, that's the way it goes in a free society: some people want lobster, too, and can't afford it. Some can't even afford hamburger. We don't try to nationalize supermarkets, do we?

Health care is available to all through mandated access to hospitals. What we should do to try to keep costs down is allow those hospitals to try to recoup through the legal system their "charitable" outlays to treat those who use the emergency rooms as their primary treatment option. That would lower the true basic cost of health care.

Unfortunately for you, I don't see your conclusion becoming reality anytime soon. As a matter of fact, the more people have had the time to consider the Democrat approach to the situation, the more unpopular it's become.

That's just a fact; check the poll history on it for yourself.

That's pretty much why the issue's dead in the water and Republican Scott Brown now holds the Senate seat of "Liberal Lion" Ted Kennedy.
Res ipsa loquitur. ("The thing speaks for itself.")

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